Category Archives: Research

Sri Lanka National Capacity Building Initiative in Cybercrime Forensics, Cybersecurity and Cyber Intelligence

Dr Abhaya Induruwa delivers the keynote address at the Cybersecurity Industry Forum in Sri Lanka

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Dr Abhaya Induruwa, Director of the Centre for Cybercrime & Security Innovation (CCSI) recently delivered the keynote address at the Cyber Security Industry Forum organised by Sri Lanka Telecom in collaboration with the Sri Lanka CERT|CC (Computer Emergency Readiness Team| Coordination Centre).  The theme of Abhaya’s address was the importance of National Capacity Building Initiative in Cybercrime Forensics, Cybersecurity and Cyber Intelligence in Sri Lanka. The event held at Hotel Hilton Residencies, Colombo, Sri Lanka was attended by more than 150 CIOs, CISOs, CEOs and other security industry personnel.

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Attending and Presenting at the 2017 National Conference for Learning and Teaching in Cyber Security

In April 2017 a number of Canterbury Christ Church University final year students and staff members attended, and presented, at the National Conference for Learning and Teaching in Cyber Security at Liverpool John Moores University. The two day Conference had a positive edge starting with the first day having been centric toward student presentations and competitions. It was great to see that a number of final year students from Universities in the United Kingdom working on some fantastic projects in a vast range of areas, such as web applications, malware, mobile phone apps and cybercrime. Many conferences lack this element to provide students the opportunity to step into the limelight, so it was fantastic to see feedback and questions posed for the students. Encouraging work and a fantastic experience for the final year students, as I am sure they would agree. It was also positive to see the vibe the student competitions provided at the event. 

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IoT BLE Security Vulnerability

Results of a study undertaken by an SRA supported by School RKE funds.

“Things” as referred to in The Internet of “Things”, are everyday objects that have been adapted to be hosts for low energy sensors. These sensors provide the data thus enabling  these “Things” (Devices) to communicate with a network of some kind, in order to either share data or be managed, using a range of Bluetooth and Wireless technologies.

Low energy sensors can be embedded into many devices such as light switches, door locks, power sockets and actuators, which in turn are used to control or monitor more complex things such as central heating systems and home security systems.

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Cheap(ish) Scanning at Home using a Microsoft® Kinect

It is accurate to say that everybody knows what a printer is – a device that puts information on paper. Fast-forward to the 21-century, and printers still have a place in the world. Although now, the most common form of a printer is one which prints information from the computer onto paper. There are a variety of printers available to do this including inkjet, laser and dot-matrix – the latter of which is no longer in common usage (thankfully).

In a similar way that the aforementioned computer printers print 2-dimensional information onto paper, 3-dimensional printers can create objects using plastic. This is done using a heated nozzle laying down layers of molten plastic in a pre-defined pattern. The layers (which are commonly a fraction of a millimetre thick) eventually build up into an object.

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Black Holes Research at Planck 2015, by Mike Hewitt

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Delegates at Planck 2015.

The department recently supported me to give a paper on my work on black holes and quantum information theory at the Planck 2015 conference in Ioannina, Greece. This is an annual, high level meeting of particle physicists and it was exciting to be able to present my work at such a prestigious event, at the invitation of the organisers.  Black holes are thought to be the ultimate information storage system, with an incredibly high capacity which is proportional to their surface area. Recent work in quantum information theory indicates that they should be surrounded by a ‘firewall’ of radiation but it is not clear where this would come from.  My work suggests that such a hot object could form during gravitational collapse due to an effect from string theory, which would be a dramatic vindication of the ideas used in the development of quantum computers.

About the author:

Mike Hewitt is a lecturer in Computing, Digital Forensics and Cybersecurity at Canterbury Christ Church University.

The programme from the event can be downloaded here.
(Mike’s lecture is listed on page 4).

‘Bring Your Own Device’ culture in Kent SMEs

During the summer of 2014, researchers from the Department of Computing at Canterbury Christ Church University conducted a study into the concept of ‘Bring Your Own Device’ (BYOD) in small and medium enterprises in Kent.

The phenomenon of BYOD is a trend which is believed to heighten productivity of employees and the business itself. This concept is currently one of the up and coming large technological trend for businesses and encompasses the implementation of policies which allow employees to associate and use their own device with the company’s IT infrastructure, giving the employees access to business-specific and/or restricted data and services internally and externally. Mobility demands within enterprises are continuously growing, however questions arise as to whether BYOD can help fulfil such requirements or whether it presents security challenges and risks too significant for implementation. Continue reading